ISAR5 User Manual v0.10

 

 

 


Reference:                   ISAR-User-Manual-v0.10.doc

Issue:                           Draft

Date of issue:               Thursday, 11 March 2004

Document type:                        User Manual


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Restricted Rights Notice

The ISAR instrument design and ISAROS software program including all accompanying procedures, functions and documentation described herein are made available under license agreement with Craig Donlon.  Their use, duplication, and disclosure are subject to the restrictions stated in the license agreement.

 

Limitation of Warranty

Craig Donlon. makes no warranties, either express or implied, as to any matter not expressly set forth in the license agreement, including without limitation the condition of software, merchantability, or fitness for any particular purpose.

 

Craig Donlon. shall not be liable for any direct, consequential, or other damages suffered by the Licensee or any others resulting from the use of the ISAR instrument or ISAROS software or any associated documentation.

 

Permission to reproduce this Manual

Purchasers of an ISAR instrument and ISAROS software code license are given limited permission to reproduce this manual provided such copies are for their use and are not sold or distributed to third parties.  All such copies must contain the title page and this notice in their entirety.

 

 

 

 

Copyright © 2003 by Craig Donlon.


 

Craig Donlon M Reynolds . General License Agreement

Important: carefully read this license agreement ("license") before using this product. Your installation, copying, or use of this Product indicates your acceptance of this license, and that you agree to be bound by and comply with all of its terms.

 

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The following clauses apply to Software components of the Product.

 

H1. U.S. GOVERNMENT END USERS:

The Product is a "commercial item," as that term is defined in 48 C.F.R. 2.101 (Oct. 1995), consisting of "commercial computer software" and "commercial computer software documentation," as such terms are used in 48 C.F.R. 12.212 (Sept. 1995). Consistent with 48 C.F.R. 12.212 and 48 C.F.R. 227.7202-1 through 227.7202-4 (June 1995), all U.S. Government End Users acquire the Software with only those rights set forth herein.

 

H2. EUROPEAN COMMUNITY END USERS:

If this Software is used within a country of the European Community, nothing in this Agreement shall be construed as restricting any rights available under the European Community Software Directive, O.J. Eur. Comm. (No. L. 122) 42 (1991).

 

I. TECHNICAL SUPPORT AND PRODUCT UPGRADES:

Craig Donlon. offers free technical support and product upgrades for a period of 90 days from the date of purchase on all licensed Products.  Technical support can only be provided to the end user if each end user orders a separate license for the Product. Technical support and product upgrades may be provided beyond 90 days if a "Support and Upgrade Contract" is purchased.

 

 

 


Document change record

 

Author

Modification

Issue

Rev.

Date

C Donlon

Original

DRAFT

0.1

March 27, 2003

C Donlon

Updated to isaros-v6.1 data format

DRAFT

0.2

April 3rd 2003

C Donlon

Updated to isaros-v6.2 data format

DRAFT

0.3

April 22nd 2003

C Donlon

Updated to new isaros6.2 format

DRAFT

0.4

May 5th 2003

C Donlon

Updated with inputs from Gary Fisher

DRAFT

0.6

June 6th 2003

C Donlon

Included PNI setup and revised Encoder setup sections.  Checked data format sections and updated to isaros-v6.7. Added prototy6pe optical alignment and prototype GPS configuration sections.

DRAFT

0.7

August 14th 2003

C Donlon

Added SCS enabled routines and data format description

DRAFT

0.8

November 10th 2003

C Donlon

Updated and corrected errors

DRAFT

0.9

January 20th 2004

C Donlon

Revised to isaros-v7.1

DRAFT

0.10

March 6th 2004

C Donlon & M Reynolds

Revised to isaros-v7.2 and redesigned outputs for SCS operations while in Miami building ISAR#1.  Added new section describing hardware.

DRAFT

0.11

March 14th 2004

 



Table of contents

 

1     Introduction.......................................................................................................................................... 9

2     Unpacking the ISAR5 system............................................................................................................. 11

3     Connecting the ISAR5 system........................................................................................................... 13

3.1       Peripheral device wiring schedule............................................................................................ 14

3.1.1     Serial interface wiring........................................................................................................... 14

3.1.2     Optical rain gauge wiring...................................................................................................... 14

3.1.3     RS485 device wiring............................................................................................................. 14

3.1.4     Power supply wiring............................................................................................................. 14

3.1.5     GPS antennae wiring............................................................................................................ 15

4     ISAR5 software installation............................................................................................................... 17

5     Using the ISAR5 for the first time....................................................................................................... 19

6     Using the ISAR5 diagnostics software (PROTOnnn)........................................................................ 20

6.1       Testing the ISAR5 instrument.................................................................................................... 21

7     Using the ISAROS© operational data logging software..................................................................... 23

7.1       Using the ISAR-5 Compact Flash card and PicoDOS................................................................ 23

7.2       Loading a new program onto the ISAR-5C instrument.............................................................. 23

7.2.1     Loading a new rhx program onto the ISAR-5C..................................................................... 24

7.2.2     Storing a new program in the ISAR-5C flash memory.......................................................... 24

7.2.3     Stopping the ISAR5 resident data logging program............................................................... 25

7.3       Configuration of ISAR-5: Using the isarconf.icf file.................................................................. 25

7.3.1     Configuration of KT15.85D parameters................................................................................. 26

7.3.2     Setting the ScanDrum park angle.......................................................................................... 26

7.3.3     Setting the shutter open delay following a rain event........................................................... 27

7.3.4     Setting the Optical Rain gauge shutter trigger threshold....................................................... 27

7.3.5     Setting the Shaft Encoder Reference position...................................................................... 27

7.3.6     Setting the heated black body............................................................................................... 28

7.3.7     Logging data to the ISAR compact Flashcard....................................................................... 28

7.3.8     Configuring ISAR measurement angles................................................................................. 28

7.3.9     Requesting ISAR to provide a real time SSTskin data record............................................... 29

7.3.10       Requesting ISAR to provide diagnostic data at boot......................................................... 30

7.3.11       Requesting ISAR to log raw GPS data.............................................................................. 30

7.3.12       Requesting ISAR to log raw PNI TCM-2 compass data..................................................... 30

7.3.13       Requesting ISAR to log SCS enabled data........................................................................ 30

7.3.14       Changing PNI TCM-2 pitch and Roll alarm limits................................................................. 30

7.3.15       Using the ISAR5 RS485 sub-system................................................................................. 31

7.3.16       Configuration of ISAR basic measurements..................................................................... 31

8     ISAR5 data record format.................................................................................................................. 32

8.1       $ISMSG data records................................................................................................................ 32

8.2       Standard data record format ($ISAR5)..................................................................................... 33

8.3       Averaged data record format ($IS5MR).................................................................................... 34

8.4       SSTskin data record format ($I5SST)....................................................................................... 36

8.5       GPS Fix data (NEMA version 2.1) format ($GPGGA)................................................................ 37

8.6       GPS recommended minimum specific GPS/transit data (NEMA version 2.1) format ($GPRMC)................................................................................................................................... 38

8.7       TCM2 Electronic compass record format ($PNIST)................................................................... 38

8.8       Diagnostic data record format ($DIAGN).................................................................................. 38

8.9       SCS enabled Standard data record format ($I5SCS).............. Error! Bookmark not defined.

8.10     SCS enabled SSTskin data record format ($SCSST).............. Error! Bookmark not defined.

9     Maintenance....................................................................................................................................... 39

9.1       General maintenance................................................................................................................ 39

9.2       Replacement of mirror (Procedure RM)..................................................................................... 40

9.2.1     Equipment and supplies......................................................................................................... 40

9.2.2     Procedure RM........................................................................................................................ 40

9.3       Reconfiguration of US-DIGITAL shaft encoder Procedure (SE)............................................... 43

9.3.1     Equipment and supplies......................................................................................................... 43

9.3.2     Procedure SE........................................................................................................................ 43

9.4       Replacement of ISAR-5C ZnSe window (Procedure RW)........................................................ 45

9.4.1     Equipment and supplies......................................................................................................... 45

9.4.2     Procedure RW....................................................................................................................... 45

9.5       Configuration of the PNI-TCM2 (procedure PNI)........................................................................ 49

9.5.1     Equipment and supplies......................................................................................................... 49

9.5.2     Procedure PNI........................................................................................................................ 49

9.6       Configuration of GPS card (Lassen SK-II)................................................................................ 50

9.6.1     Equipment and supplies......................................................................................................... 50

9.6.2     Procedure GPS...................................................................................................................... 50

9.7       Optical alignment (procedure OI)............................................................................................... 51

9.7.1     Equipment and supplies......................................................................................................... 52

9.7.2     Procedure OI......................................................................................................................... 52

10        Troubleshooting............................................................................................................................. 55

10.1     Software................................................................................................................................... 55

10.2     Hardware.................................................................................................................................. 55

Appendix A  Example isarconf.icf file....................................................................................................... 57

 


1       Introduction

The Infrared Sea surface temperature Autonomous Radiometer model 5 (ISAR-5) has been developed to provide accurate and reliable measurements of the radiative sea surface temperature (SSTskin) to an accuracy of ±0.1 K within the spectral waveband 9.8-11.mm (see Table 1.1).  In the past, one of the major problems to obtaining accurate SSTskin measurements from ships has been adequate environmental protection of delicate infrared radiometer fore-optics. Sea-water spray or rain can introduce significant errors and in extreme cases, destroy instrumentation without prompt operator intervention. The ISAR-5 system has been specifically designed to address these problems and provide a self calibrating infra red radiometer system that can operate autonomously for extended periods when deployed from a ship of opportunity (SOO).  AS SSTskin measurements alone are often of marginal value, additional meteorological or oceanographic instrumentation can be connected to the ISAR-5 system to provide a complete user specified measurement package.

 

Table 1.1 ISAR-5 instrument Specifications

 

Spectral range 9.6-11.5mm
Response time 0.05-10s (user defined)
SSTskin Accuracy[1] ±0.1K rmse.
Temperature range 173-373 K
Target angle range 180° (nadir-zenith) in 0.1° intervals (user defined)
Maximum continuous deployment at sea 0-3 months
Min. deployment height 7m
Calibration type 2 internal radiance cavities
Output RS232/NMEA style
Weight <15 kg
Dimensions Diameter 200mm x 500 mm
Operating temperature 274 - 310 K (non-freezing)
Power input 16V DC

 

 

This operations manual describes the configuration, operation and deployment of an ISAR-5 system.  It is meant to be a user reference guide that provides sufficient information for you to configure and begin making measurements with the ISAR5 system.  Several procedures are described that may be performed by a competent technician although it should be recognized that any warranty agreement may be void if these are undertaken.  Their inclusion is meant to be a last resort should things go wrong at sea without the ability to return the ISAR instrument to base for a proper service and repair.

 

The following symbols are used within this manual:

 

i Indicates useful information and tips to help you work with your ISAR5

M  Indicates critical information that should be read with care and attention

 

It is assumed that you as a user are competent with handling PC computers, software installation, basic wiring of plugs and have a competent understanding of making infrared measurements of the sea surface and atmosphere.



2       Unpacking the ISAR5 system

This section of the ISAR5 manual explains how to:

 

1.     Unpack and repack the ISAR5 system and peripheral devices

2.     Check for damaged items

3.     Check that all components are present

 

The ISAR5 is shipped in a robust travel case that contains all of the necessary hardware and software to operate the ISAR5 instrument.  However, as each deployment requires consideration of local mounting options, it will be necessary to construct a mounting cradle specific to your deployment.  Please contact the ISAR team for advice on suitable mounting options.   Operational deployment of ISAR-5C on a ship is discussed in more detail in section ??.

 

i Do handle all items with care and inspect each one for obvious damage.  If you suspect that any ISAR component is damaged, please notify the ISAR team immediately.

 

 

Figure 2.1. The ISAR-5 radiometer and Optical rain gauge.

 

Before you begin to use your ISAR5, please take some time to check that your ISAR system is complete and that there are no obvious signs of damage.  Use Table 2.1 to ensure that all items are present in the box when first unpacking and contact the ISAR team if any items are missing. 

 

Table 2.1 ISAR-5 component list.

 

Item code

Number supplied

Description

ISAR5-01

1

ISAR-5C instrument

ISAR5-02

1

Optical rain gauge

ISAR5-03

1

Trimbell GPS magnetic antenna

ISAR5-04

1

Cable for Mini-ORG

ISAR5-05

1

Cable for ISAR-5 power

ISAR5-06

1

Communications cable for ISAR-5 instrument

ISAR5-07

1

KT15 Optical alignment tool

ISAR5-08

1

Small spot size laser for optical alignment with manual

ISAR5-09

1

KT15 lens mount for laser

ISAR5-10

1

US-Digital shaft encoder configuration interface card

ISAR5-11

1

US-Digital shaft encoder configuration software (3.5” floppy disk) and manual.

ISAR5-12

1

ISAR5 operational software CD.

ISAR5-13

1

ScTI Mini-ORG optical rain gauge operations manual

ISAR5-14

1

Trimbell GPS operations manual

ISAR5-15

1

Tattletale operations manual

ISAR5-16

1

Heitronics KT15.85D operations manual

ISAR5-17

1

Hietronics KT15.85D instrument data (3.5” floppy disk)

ISAR5-18

1

4 Impulse connector blanks

ISAR5-19

1

Calibration certificate

ISAR5-20

1

CD-ROM containing software/documentation etc

ISAR5-21

1

GPS configuration software

 


3       Connecting the ISAR5 system

This section of the ISAR5 manual explains how to:

 

1.     Connect the ISAR5 Optical rain gauge to the ISAR instrument

2.     Connect the GPS antennae to the ISAR5 instrument

3.     Connect a power supply to the ISAR5 instrument

4.     Connect external user RS485 devices to the ISAR5 instrument

5.     Connect the ISAR5 to a computer

 

Figure 3.1 shows the electronics housing end cap of the ISAR-5C instrument and the necessary connections to the external devices.  Use this as a guide to connect the ISAR-5C system noting the orientation of the ISAR-5C using the 7 LED indicators as a guide.

 

 

Figure 3.1 View of the ISAR5 end plate showing how external connections are made to the instrument.  Use the indicator panel lights to orient the ISAR-5C body.

 

Connect each of the peripheral devices to the ISAR-5C instrument as shown in Figure 3.1 ensuring that the connections are well made.  It may be wise to use a small amount of silicone grease to secure a waterproof seal on each connector.  Wiring tables are given below for each peripheral device.

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.1     Peripheral device wiring schedule

3.1.1     Serial interface wiring

The serial interface IMPULSE plug is wired according to Table 3.1.1.1

 

Table 3.1.1.1  Serial interface IMPULSE plug wiring schedule

Impulse pin number

Serial pin number

Wire colour

Purpose

1

1

Screen (Green)

Screen/Case

2

5

Black

Signal Ground

3

3

Orange

Transmitted Data (PC->>ISAR)

4

-

Red

Reset Switch

5

-

Yellow

Reset Switch

6

2

Brown

Received Data (ISAR ->> PC)

 

Serial interface communication settings are shown in Table 3.1.1.2

 

Table 3.1.1.2  Serial communications parameters for ISAR5 serial interface

Name

Setting

Baud

9600

Data Bits

8

Stop Bits

1

Parity

None

Handshake

None

 

3.1.2     Optical rain gauge wiring

The optical rain gauge IMPULSE socket is wired according to Table 3.1.2.1

 

Table 3.1.2.1  Optical rain gauge IMPULSE socket wiring schedule

Impulse pin number

Wire colour

Purpose

ORG Connector pin number

1

Screen

 

 

2

Black

Ground

E

3

Orange

Analogue Signal

A

4

Red

+12Volt DC

D

5

Yellow

 

 

6

Brown

Analogue Ground

B

7

Green

 

 

8

Blue

 

 

 

3.1.3     RS485 device wiring

The RS485 IMPULSE socket is wired according to Table 3.1.3.1

 

Table 3.1.3.1  RS485 IMPULSE socket wiring schedule

Impulse pin number

Wire colour

Purpose

1

Screen

 

2

Black

Ground

3

Orange

 

4

Red

+12Volt DC

5

Yellow

Data+

6

Brown

 

7

Green

Data-

8

Blue

 

3.1.4     Power supply wiring

The Power supply IMPULSE socket is wired according to Table 3.1.4.1

 

Table 3.1.4.1  Serial interface IMPULSE socket wiring schedule

Impulse pin number

Wire colour

Purpose

1

Screen/Green

Ground/Case

2

Black/Brown

Supply Ground

3

Red/Orange

+12Volt DC

 

i  Ensure that the correct voltage is set on the power supply unit (15-16 V DC) and always use an uninterruptible power supply with a current limit facility. If the input power falls below 15V DC the on board TT8 computer may require a hard power reset as the internal registers may be corrupted.  This may be difficult to determine as the operational code may continue running although the data will be incorrect!

 

The ISAR5 on-board computer is a Tattletale Model 8 (TT8) manufactured by Onsett computer corporation  and further information can be found at http://www.onsetcomp.com/.

 

For operational deployments, use an uninterruptible power supply.  For the first power on of the instrument, ensure that you have any current limit capability turned to minimum and slowly increase the current limit.

 

MISAR-5 should draw about 0.5-0.7 A during normal operations and ~1 – 1.2 A during motor operations. If excessive current is drawn, immediately power off and contact the ISAR team for advice and assistance.

 

3.1.5     GPS antennae wiring

The GPS antennae BNC socket is wired according to Table 3.1.5.1

 

Table 3.1.5.1  GPS antennae BNC socket wiring schedule

BNC

Wire colour

Purpose

 

 

 

 



4       ISAR5 software installation

This section of the ISAR5 manual explains how to:

 

1.     Install ISAR5 software on a computer that will be used to control the ISAR5 instrument

 

Please install the operational software provided on the ISAR-5C CD-ROM following the instructions provided in the README.TXT file.  Typically, the ISAR code is copied to a directory with the following structure:

Table 4.1 Directory structure of the ISAR-5C software distribution

 

Directory structure

Contents and purpose

\isar\Documentation

Contains all ISAR-5 documentation

\isar\bin

Contains executable (*.rhx and *.ahx) TT microcomputer files

\isar\source

Contains ISAR-5C source code

\isar\configuration

Contains ISAR-5C configuration files (these are instrument specific)

\isar\calibration

Contains calibration files for ISAR-5C components

\isar\data

Default directory for data files

\isar\CrossCut-v2.01

Directory containing CrossCut communications program

\isar\PicoDos

PicoDos software

 

 

It is assumed that the user has installed the CrossCut v2.08 (for Linux use minicom and see Appendix B) program and read through the documentation supplied on the ISAR-5 CD-ROM before proceeding further.

 

 



5       Using the ISAR5 for the first time

The ISAR5 instrument is shipped with a basic diagnostic program called proto which can be used to familiarise yourself with the ISAR5 system and to test all of the instrument functionality.  ISAR5 allows considerable flexibility for defining how the instrument will make measurements.  This section of the manual explains how to:

 

  1. Interact with the ISAR5 instrument using a terminal emulator
  2. Test the ISAR5 system

 

To operate, the ISAR5 requires connection to a personal computer running Microsoft DOS/Windows or LINUX operating system. Only the DOS/Windows systems will be considered here and in the case of LINUX please see Appendix B.

 

The ISAR onboard computer (TT8) communicates with a host computer through a serial port via a resident mini-monitor program called TOM8.  The TT8 computer can accept and execute C programs, interact with a user and offload logged data for final analysis. A communications interface is required on the host computer and the DOS CrossCut program supplied with the TT8 may be used for this purpose.

 

On initial power up the ISAR5 should automatically run the proto diagnostic software code that is stored in the ISAR5 EEPROM.

 

i The ISAR5 has a small panel of light emitting diodes (LED) to indicate the operational status of the instrument shown in Figure 5.1.


 

 


Figure 5.1  ISAR-5 status lights layout

 

Figure 5.1 shows the layout of the LED status lights and Table 5.1 describes their function.

 

Table 5.1 ISAR-5 status lights function

Position

Color

Indicates…

1

Green

BB1 heater on/off

2

Green

KT15.85D on/off

3

Red

Indicates status of watchdog timer If lit OK

4

Green

Spare power circuit on/off

5

Green

12 V DC ISAR-5C power supply on/off

6

Yellow

Heartbeat (blinking if OK)

7

Green

BB2 heater on/off

 


6       Using the ISAR5 diagnostics software (PROTOnnn)

The PROTOnnn (where nnn refers to the release version of the codebase e.g. PROTO111) software is stored as a memory resident program within the TT8 EEPROM system and also as a compiled executable file located on the ISAR5 compact flash card (see section 7.1).  This code will be run every time the ISAR5 is turned on automatically until you replace the EEPROM with another program.

 

Table 6.1 Command set for the PROTOnnn program (Proto111, 2003-06-06)

Key

Description

Expected result

>

Selects the Engineering menu option page

Screen presents engineering menu command options

(

Computes a Mean and Standard deviation of Mini-ORG measurements for use in the isarconf.icf file

Mean and SD calculation results are presented

$

Prints the contents of the flashcard file ISARDATA.DAT

The entire ISARDATA.DAT file is printed to the screen allowing it to be captured and saved.

?

Selects the Operational menu page

Screen presents operational menu command options

[

Executes the EnableEncoder() function

Enables the USDIGITAL shaft encoder for comms

]

Executes the DisableEncoder() function

Enables the USDIGITAL shaft encoder for comms

*

Obtain data over a scan drum arc (Useful to scan over the black bodies)

Points scan drum to an initial position, increments the scan drum position until position 2 is reached.  Prints data for each scan drum position

a

Turns the ISAR5 spare power line on/off

Green LED 4 (Fig 5.1) on/off

A

Turns the KT15 on/off

Green LED 6 (Fig 5.1) on/off

b

Turns BB1 heater on/off

Green LED 3 (Fig 5.1) on/off

B

Turns BB2 heater on/off

Green LED 7 (Fig 5.1) on/off

C

Sends a command to an RS485 device

Sends a command to the RS485 system

C

Reads all channels of the AD 4017 unit

Prints values (counts) to the screen

d

Opens the ISAR-5C shutter

Opens the shutter

D

Closes the ISAR-5C shutter

Closes the shutter

E

Reads the position of the scan drum

Prints scan drum angular position (degrees) with reference to the set zero position (see F)

E

Move the scan drum to a given angular position

Moves the scan drum to the angular position (degrees) you provide with reference to the set zero position (see F)

F

Write a test string the ISAR-5C flashcard

A flashcard file is opened and a string is written to this file.

F

Set the shaft encoder reference position

Sets the zero position of the shaft encoder and stores the data on the encoder eeprom.

g

Read data from the GPS unit

Prints raw data read from the GPS unit (See section 8)

G

Set the ISAR-5C real time clock using the GPS signal

Sets the ISAR-5C real time clock to the UTC time value reported by the GPS unit.

h

Read the Target temperature reported by the KT15.85D

Prints data to the screen

H

Send a command to the KT15.85D

Prints a reply string from the KT15 (See KT15 manual for more information)

I

Moves the scan drum in the forward direction

Scan drum moves continuously until a key is pressed

I

Moves the scan drum in the reverse direction

Scan drum moves continuously until a key is pressed

J

Moves the shutter in the open direction (Careful not to run the shutter off the drive belt !!)

Shutter moves continuously until a key is pressed

J

Moves the shutter in the close direction (Careful not to run the shutter off the drive belt !!)

Shutter moves continuously until a key is pressed

k

Not used

 

K

Switches the Thermistor Power VRef on

 

l

Not used

 

L

Read all of the analog channels

All, analog channel data printed to screen until a key is pressed

M

Not used

 

M

Not used

 

n

Not used

 

N

Not used

 

o

Read the ScTi Optical rain gauge

Optical rain gauge data printed to screen

O

Test routine to check that rain gauge signal closes the ISAR-5C shutter

Opens the shutter and watches the rain gauge for rain.  IF a signal is detected (e.g., by waggling your fingers in front of the rain gauge sensor) the shutter will close.

p

Reads data from the PNI compass module

Prints data to the screen (See section 8)

P

Sends a command to the PNI compass  module

See the PNI TCM-2 manual for more information.  Used to set up the PNI TCM-2 module prior to use in ISAR)

q

Exit the Proto program and return to the TOM8> prompt

Returns to TOM8> prompt

Q

Not used

 

r

Reads the current ISAR-5C real time clock

Prints date and time to the screen

R

Sets the real time clock from the Tattletale time

Sets time

s

Not used

 

S

Read the status of the shutter Hall effect switches

Prints data to the screen

t

Read the Tattletale electronics board temperature, the window temperature

Prints data to the screen

T

Read BB1 and BB2 temperatures

Prints data to the screen

u

Show the current time setting of the Tattletale

Prints data to the screen

U

Set the Tattletale clock using yyymmddhhmmss

Set the TT8 clock

v

Read the input power voltage

Prints data to the screen

w

Read the KT15 internal reference temperature

Reads the digital KT15 reference (internal) temperature

W

Read the KT15 target temperature

Reads the target temperature measured by the KT15

 

A generic diagnostic program called PROTOnnn  (where nnn is the version number) is supplied with the ISAR-5 instrument to help familiarize you with the instrument and to assist in diagnosing any problems you may encounter.  A copy of this program can be found in the  \bin subdirectory of the ISAR-5C CD-ROM. 

 

i A copy of the Proto executable code is also available on the ISAR5 Compact Flash card (called Protonnn.R). While in PicoDOS, this program can be executed by typing its name and pressing enter (see section 7 below for details of how to access the ISAR Compact Flash card).

 

6.1     Testing the ISAR5 instrument

The ISAR-05C instrument has the PROTOnnn program already resident in flash memory so that on power up, the program will automatically start.  Table 6.1 describes the command set of the PROTOnnn program.

 

Start the CrossCut interface and you should be presented with a menu of PROTOnnn options. Pressing ? will recall this menu screen at any time.  As you can see, a command is executed by typing a letter which is case sensitive.  Some commands have additional requirements and you will be prompted to enter appropriate data by the program.  The command menu is summarized in Table 4.1 below.

 

The PROTOnnn program can be used to test the ISAR-5 instrument in order to make sure that no damage has occurred during transportation. The following tests should be executed:

 

 

i  Should the any test fail please contact the ISAR-5C team immediately!

 

Once you have successfully completed all the diagnostic tests, you are ready to begin using the ISAR-5.

 


7       Using the ISAROS© operational data logging software

ISAR5 allows considerable flexibility for defining how the instrument will make measurements for an operational deployment using the ISAROS (ISAR Operating System).  This section of the ISAR5 manual explains how to:

 

1.     Access the ISAR5 compact flashcard using PicoDOS functions

2.     Upload a new isaros executable program to the TT8 computer

3.     Store a file on the Compact flash card

4.     Load a new isaros executable program into the ISAR5 EEPROM

5.     Configure the isaros software to make user defined measurements

 

 

7.1     Using the ISAR-5 Compact Flash card and PicoDOS

The ISAR-5 system has an internal 120Mb compact flash card that can be used to store programs, configuration files, calibration information and data files.  To access the Flash card it is necessary to execute the Peripheral Issues Card Or Disk Operating System or “PicoDOS” flash program using:

 

g 2bcf8

 

PicoDOS replicates most of the functionality of a "real" DOS, but embedded in TT8. The PicoDOS kernel and command shell provides you with transparent access to DOS compatible file functions.  The following DOS Emulation Commands mimic the syntax and behavior of their DOS counterparts as shown in Table 7.1.1

 

Table 7.1.1 PicoDOS commands

Name

Purpose

Syntax

CAPTURE

Save a file from the Serial port

Capture <filename>

COPY

Copy fa file

copy <source filename>  <destination filename>

DATE

Print/set the TT8 date

Date

DEL

Delete files

del <filename>

DIR

List files

dir [wildcards]

ERASE

Erase a file

erase <filename>

FORMAT

Format a compact flashcard

format [/Q][/E][/F]

TIME

Print/Set TT8 time

Time

TYPE

Print the contents of a file

type <filename>

REN

Rename a file

Ren <oldname> <newname>

VER

Print  the software version

Ver

?

Print a help screen with syntax information

?

 

i   All commands are described in detail in the PicoDOS user manual in the \ISAR5C-Documentation subdirectory of the ISAR-5 CD.

 

7.2     Loading a new program onto the ISAR-5C instrument

Before any program can be executed, it is necessary to load the program onto the TT8 computer. Two types of Motorola S-record programs are provided with the ISAR-5C:

 

*.RHX  which is a runtime hex S-record file loaded to RAM

*.AHX              which is an application hex S-record file loaded to flash ROM.

 

The major difference is that an RHX S-record is memory resident (RAM) and needs to be re-loaded after each execution has terminated whereas an AHX record is burnt onto the TT8 flash which is described in the following section. 

 

M   It is always wise to run the RHX version of your program first to check that all is well before loading an AHX file.  Sometimes it can be difficult to clear a program from flash if there is an error without first disassembling an ISAR5 instrument!

 

To clear a program from Flash, there is a hex file called NOPROG.AHX file in the  \bin  subdirectory. You can load NOPROG.AHX just as any other application hex file, but all it does is erase the portion of the Flash memory where the start of the program is found. When the ISAR-5C is powered on, the TOM8 monitor notices that there is no longer a program loaded.

7.2.1     Loading a new rhx program onto the ISAR-5C

To load a program into RAM, first make sure that the Terminal window is shown and the ISAR-5C is connected and powered up. Press <return> a few times on your PC. You should keep getting the TOM8>  prompt in the Terminal window. Select the Tattletale menu item while in CrossCut and then the Load S-record entry (short-cut is Alt-L).  This sends the proper commands to the TOM8 monitor to allow a high-speed (57600 baud) load of an S-record executable program to the TT8.

 

i  Complete information on the operation of the TT8 computer can be found in the documentation provided in the \Documentation\TT8-Manual directory on the ISAR-5C CD-ROM.

 

You will be prompted to enter the file name of the S-record to load. Use the TAB and cursor keys or the mouse to select  your rhx file and press ENTER when that file is highlighted. A dialog appears showing the process of the download. After the download you should see the following prompt:

 

TOM8>

load successful

 

To run the program, type g at the TOM8>  prompt. This jumps to the starting address of the program (which the TOM8 monitor received from the S-Record) and executes it.

7.2.2     Storing a new program in the ISAR-5C flash memory

Loading a program to Flash memory is very similar to loading to RAM.  When the ISAR-5C is powered up, the TOM8 mini-monitor will check for a program in Flash and execute this immediately.  Thus, an application will automatically run at power-up or hardware reset if it is burned into the ISAR-5C Flash.

 

M    When loading a new AHX file to the ISAR-5C this will overwrite the contents of the TT8 memory (e.g. the proto301.ahx program)!

 

To load the isar5.ahx program onto flash, first make sure that the Terminal window is shown and the ISAR-5C connected and powered. Press return a few times on your PC. You should keep getting the TOM8>  prompt in the Terminal window. Go to the Tattletale menu and choose  Load S-record  (or press Alt-L). A file dialog appears and you should use the TAB and cursor keys or the mouse to select  your ahx and press ENTER when that file is highlighted.  A dialog appears showing the process of the download. After the download you should see something similar to the following prompt (the start and end address values may vary):

 

TOM8>

load successful

 

Target is Flash!

start addr = 00002000

end addr = 00006105

 

Ok to write flash between above addresses? (Y/N)

 

Press the y key to burn the program into Flash memory. The progress of the burn and the Flash ID are shown. To execute the program, while at the TOM8> prompt type g.  To verify that the new isaros.ahx program is in Flash, turn off power to the ISAR-5C and then reapply it. The program should run automatically.  Remember that you can always re-load an old flash resident program that you have overwritten.

7.2.3     Stopping the ISAR5 resident data logging program

When the ISAR5 is powered up, the isaros data logging program is automatically run.  The initial factory configuration of the isaros code will make a SSTskin temperature measurement using a target view angle of 45º from nadir for the sea, 45º from zenith for the sky and a sea water emissivity of 0.98. However, for many deployments this configuration will be far from optimal.

 

By pressing Q the isaros data logging software should stop and place you at the TOM8> prompt.

 

 

7.3     Configuration of ISAR-5: Using the isarconf.icf file

The ISAR5 operational software, isaros, has been written to provide a versatile and easily configurable data logging software interface.

 

The isarconf.icf file is an instrument configuration file that is read by the isar system every time the data logging program isaros is started.  It is stored on the ISAR5 compact flash card.  The isarconf.icf file is an ASCII text file with a very specific format and contains instrument specific calibration data, component identifications and user configuration fields.  The general format of the isarconf.icf file is for a comment line, denoted by a # at the start of the line, followed by a data line.  For example

 

# ISAR-5C serial number (int)

2

 

i  A complete isarconf.icf file is provided as a reference in Appendix 2.

 

A complete isarconf.icf file is provided as a reference in Appendix 2.

 

In general, the comment line provides the format of the data line.  No comment line should exceed 255 characters in length.  In general only a few isarconf.icf fields need to be changed by a user these are discussed by task in the following sub-sections.

 

M Modifying any of the calibration data entries within the isarconf.icf file may result in either your ISAR refusing to boot or incorrect results.  ALWAYS make a backup copy of the isarconf.icf file on the ISAR flashcard before modifying any entries.

 

All of the fields that require user editing are provided at the start of the ISAR conf.icf file.  Most entries should not be changed unless you are absolutely certain that you know what is required and the implications of your changes for the isaros data logging system and for your own measurements.  In general it should only be necessary to set up the header sections, scan drum and associated sampling characteristics, the real time SST calculation configuration and any external RS485 devices you have connectexd th the ISAR instrument.

 

The following isarconf.icf entries should be used to describe the purpose of the isarconf.icf file:

 

# L1: Title stating purpose of this isarconf file (str[255])

v65lab.icf ICF for ISAR-5C-003; Setup for BB cals, log to flashcard:ON, SST calculation:ON, diagnostics:ON, Raw PNI output:ON raw GPS output:ON

# L2: Author name, e-mail and telephone number (str[255])

C J Donlon (craig.donlon@jrc.it tel:+39 0332 786353)

# L3: Last Edit date yyyy-mm-dd (str[15])

2003-06-05

 

 

7.3.1     Configuration of KT15.85D parameters

The KT15.85D may be configured to operate in a variety of different modes.  The isarconf.icf file allows a user to define the serial number of the KT15 unit, calibration information, emissivity settings, response times and communication parameters.  The following settings provide a default configuration for a KT15 radiometer although these values are specific to instrument serial number 4801:

 

# L33: KT15.85D Serial number (int)

4801

# L34: Date and details of KT15.85D last calibration (str[255])

2001-27-11 (Not used until 2003-05-05)

# L35: KT15 emissivity setting command (0.001 -> 1.000) (str[15])

EPS 1.000

# L36: KT15 response setting command (0.05, 0.1, 0.3, 1 3 or 10 seconds) (str[15])

RESP 1.0

# L37: KT15 analog output setting command (Do you know what you are doing ?) (str[30])

ANALOG -100.0 50.0 C 3

# L38: KT15 serial interface setting (Do you know what you are doing ?) (str[20])

COM 96 8 1 n

# L39: KT15 Temperature to Radiance coefficients based on kt15 filter response (-1 not used) (double[9])

-22.925646e0,65.196703e0,-81.215855e0,56.792568e0,-21.105313e0,3.2575460e0,-1.0,-1.0,-1.0

# L40: Radiance to Temperature coefficients based on kt15 filter response (-1 not used) (double[9])

273.15973e0,54.529628e0,10.634341e0,2.0172007d0,3.6480705e-1,5.7776974e-2,6.5293295e-3, 3.5814663e-4,1.0

 

Notes:

  1. The KT15 serial number is unique to each unit.  It is entered into the isarconf.icf file in order that a cross check may be made between the KT15 by reading the serial number off the unit and the isarconf.icf  value.  In this way, the calibration data applied to the KT15 should be valid.
  2. The KT15 calibration date refers to the last calibration of the KT15 unit by Heitronics and applies to the Radiance to temperature and Temperature to radiance coefficients.
  3. The KT15 emissivity value should always be set to 1.0
  4. The KT15 response time default is 1.0s
  5. The analog parameters should not be modified
  6. MThe Serial interface parameters should not be modified
  7. MThe radiance to temperature and Temperature to radiance data should not be modified.  These are specific to each KT15 unit and are computed based on the calibration data provided by Hietronics.

 

7.3.2     Setting the ScanDrum park angle

The scan drum park angle refers to the default angle at which the scan drum will be placed when the ISAR shutter is closed.  It is set using the following lines of the isarconf.icf file:

 

# L11: Park angle (normally over lower blackbody) (float,deg)

280.0

 

Notes

  1. The park angle is an absolute rotary position that has a zero position depending on the ISAR-5 shaft encoder reference position.  Normally, 0 is vertically up, 180 is vertically down.  The shaft encoder must be configured appropriately.
  2. The default position is over lower BB to prevent water ingress.

 

7.3.3     Setting the shutter open delay following a rain event

Following a rain event a delay period is required to (a) allow rainwater to drain away from the ISAR and (b) to be sure that the rain event has actually stopped.  The delay is approximately calculated as n*2 seconds and a good choice of delay is ~350.  If you are working with the ISAR in the laboratory for a calibration, then a rain event delay is not required.  Use the following lines of the isarconf.icf to reduce the shutter open delay following a rain event:

 

# L7: Number of cycles to wait after rain event (time is ~n*2 secs.  Lab=60 Field= ~350) (int)

60

 

7.3.4     Setting the Optical Rain gauge shutter trigger threshold

The Optical rain gauge (ORG) is used to trigger the ISAR shutter mechanism and close the instrument down if rain or sea spray is detected.  The ORG has a background noise level above which a rain/spray event becomes significant and this is set using an ORG mV threshold using the following isarconf.icf lines:

 

# L8: Optical rain gauge rain mV threshold below which shutter is closed (float). Lab=1.0, Field= ~0.54

0.54

 

During long deployments some surface contamination of the ORG optical system may occur and the mV threshold value must be set with some margin of allowance.  However, in this case there is an increased possibility of ISAR not closing down quickly once a rain/spray event has occurred.    Typically, a rain event is characterized by a significant increase in the Standard deviation of the signal and a second threshold may be set to trigger the ISAR shutter based on the standard deviation of the ORG signal.  A second check is made by computing the standard deviation of 25 ORG measurements and comparing this against a threshold value.  The following lines of the isarconf.icf file may be used for this purpose:

 

# L9: Optical rain guage rain mV standard deviation above which shutter is closed (float). Lab=1.0, Field= ~0.002

0.002

 

Notes:

  1. The mV mean threshold should be verified by basic tests before significant deployments at sea.  A guide value of 0.46-0.56 is typical.
  2. The mV standard deviation threshold should be verified by basic experiments before deployments at sea using the Proto code (option ‘(‘ ).  A guide value of 0.002 is typical.

 

7.3.5     Setting the Shaft Encoder Reference position

The shaft encoder reference position must be set in order for the ISAR scan drum to be able to position itself correctly.  A simple method to check the configuration is to carefully position the rear edge of the scan drum aperture flush against the back wall of the ISAR body so that it is looking vertically up and along the central cutaway.  Use the Proto software to do this.  The scan drum position should read 355.5° in this position.  If this is not the case, an appropriate zero offset may be set using the following isarconf.icf lines:

 

# L10: Encoder reference position (float,deg)

0.0

 

Notes

  1. If the Scan drum positions are inconsistent it may mean that the shaft encoder has lost its internal configuration.  This may be reset using the proto software.
  2. Be sure to line up the scan drum aperture as accurately as possible when using this method.

7.3.6     Setting the heated black body

Both ISAR BB units are identical and have a Kapton heater that can be used to heat the BB cavity.  Normally, the upper (325º) BB unit (BB1) should be heated to prevent heat loss from the cavity as the scan drum aperture opens the cavity.  The following lines of the isarconf.icf must be used to configure the BB heater system:

 

# L19: Heated (Active) blackbody (1 or 2)

1

7.3.7     Logging data to the ISAR compact Flashcard

The ISAR system as a 120Mbyte compact flashcard system that can be used to store ISAR average and SST data records.  All data are appended to a file called ISARDATA.DAT.  Data logging to the Compact flashcard is turned ON by setting the first flag in the isarconf.icf file using the following lines:

 

# L6: 10 flags:0=log data to flashcard,1=compute SSTskin (set realtime SST calculation data above) 2=test at startup, 3=print raw PNI data 4=print raw GPS data 6-9=unused  (int[10])

1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

7.3.8     Configuring ISAR measurement angles

The ISAR can be configured to obtain data at from a target any angular position (0-360º) by setting the scan drum angle to a given angular location.  Experience shows that 10 positions are sufficient for most applications and the isarconf.icf file can be used to specify 10 “set” scan drum positions using the following line in the isarconf.icf file:

 

# L12: 10 set point scan drum target measurement positions -1 if not used (float, spearator=',') BB1,BB2,sea,sky...

280.0,325.0,90.0,25.0,-1.0,-1.0,-1.0,-1.0,-1.0,-1.0

 

In this example, four target views will be sampled sequentially in the order from left to right (280, 325,90 and 25 degrees). The remaining six positions are not set (indicated by a -1.0 that is used to denote a null angle).

 

MNote that views of the ISAR calibration blackbody targets (280.0º and 325.0º must be defined as view angles here otherwise the ISAR will not function properly.

 

In addition, the positions of each BB must be set using the following lines of the isarconf.icf file:

 

# L20: Blackbody 1 position (float, deg)

280.0

# L21: Blackbody 2 position (float, deg)

325.0

 

The number of samples to take at each measurement angle that are averaged together in the SSTskin calculation and output as $IS5MR data records (see Section 8) must be set using the following lines of the isarconf.icf file:

 

# L13: 10 Number of samples for each target view. -1 if not used (int)

30,30,30,15,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1

 

Note that there is a one to one correspondence between the scan drum angles and the number of samples so that in the example given here, 30 samples will be made at angles 280,325 and 90 but only 15 samples will be made at angle 25.

 

Notes:

  1. Please ensure that exactly 10 entries are made for the scan drum target position and the sample numbers otherwise the isarconf.icf may not be read correctly at boot.
  2. It is possible to set a complex measurement sequence of alternate BB and target views using this method.
  3. Angular positions are accurate to approximately 0.1 degree

7.3.9     Requesting ISAR to provide a real time SSTskin data record

The ISAR can also compute a real time SSTskin data record which can be requested using the flags line of the isarconf.icf file as follows:

 

# L6: 10 flags:0=log data to flashcard,1=compute SSTskin (set realtime SST calculation data above) 2=test at startup, 3=print raw PNI data 4=print raw GPS data 6-9=unused  (int[10])

0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

 

In order for a SSTskin temperature to be properly derived from raw ISAR measurements the isarconf.icf file must specify which measurement angles to use to determine the sea radiance and sky radiance and what the appropriate seawater emissivity value is for a given deployment geometry.  Initially, a user must set the view angles for which ISAR will collect measurements. Following on from the other example settings described above, in this example, scan drum angle 2 (90.0º) will be used as the target “sea view” angle, scan drum angle 3 (25.0º) will be used as the target “sky view” angle and an emissivity value of 0.98123 will be used for the emissivity of seawater. As several different sea and sky angles may be defined in a typical measurement sequence, the SSTskin calculation must know which data to use for sea and sky measurements.  The following lines in the isarconf.icf file may be used for this purpose:

 

# L14: SST real time calculation setup (double): 0=seaview drumangle index,1=skyview drumangle index,2=seawater emissivity,3-9=spare

2,3,0.9916349,-1.0,-1.0,-1.0,-1.0,-1.0,-1.0,-1.0

 

where the first number is the index to the scan drum angels defined above that will be used as the target view (sea view) data (in this example, index 2 refers to a scan drum angle of 90.0º and 30 samples).  The second value provides the index to the scan drum angle that will be used to collect sky view data (in this example, index 3 refers to a scan drum angle of 25.0º and 15 samples).  The third number provides the emissivity of seawater for the sea view angle and viewing geometry of the ISAR system specific to each deployment scenario.  In this example it is 0.9916349 (valid for a view angle of 25º from nadir).

 

Finally, data logging to the Compact flashcard is turned ON by setting the first flag in the isarconf.icf file using the following lines:

 

# L6: 10 flags:0=log meanrec data to flashcard,1=compute SSTskin (set realtime SST calculation data above) 2=test at startup, 3=print raw PNI data 4=print raw GPS data, 5= write out meanrec to s

tdout, 6=enable SCS output, 7-9=unused  (int[10])

1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

 

Notes

1.     If the emissivity value is our of bounds (ie <0 or > 1.0), ISAR will not boot.

2.     Attention should be given to ensure that the SST real time setup is valid in each case otherwise the SSTskin temperature data will be in error.

3.     A sufficient number of samples (typically > 20) is recommended on each black body unit.

4.     The ISAR shaft encoder reference angle should be correct to ensure that all target views are correct.

5.     The ISAR must be deployed correctly with a known geometry relative to the sea surface in order for the target values relative to the sea surface are correct.  This may be verified using the PNI roll values.

7.3.10 Requesting ISAR to provide diagnostic data at boot

A summary of ISAR data outputs can be requested at the startup of the isaros program that can be used to check the functionality of the ISAR system and isarconf.icf file.  This function is requested by setting the third flag in the isarconf.icf file using the following lines:

 

# L6: 10 flags:0=log meanrec data to flashcard,1=compute SSTskin (set realtime SST calculation data above) 2=test at startup, 3=print raw PNI data 4=print raw GPS data, 5= write out meanrec to s

tdout, 6=enable SCS output, 7-9=unused  (int[10])

0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

7.3.11 Requesting ISAR to log raw GPS data

The raw output from the ISAR on-board GPS system can be placed onto the ISAR data stream by setting the fifth flag in the isarconf.icf file using the following lines:

 

# L6: 10 flags:0=log meanrec data to flashcard,1=compute SSTskin (set realtime SST calculation data above) 2=test at startup, 3=print raw PNI data 4=print raw GPS data, 5= write out meanrec to s

tdout, 6=enable SCS output, 7-9=unused  (int[10])

0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0

 

The GPS data string provided by the GPS unit will appear as $GPSGGA or $GPSRMC data records (see section 8).

7.3.12 Requesting ISAR to log raw PNI TCM-2 compass data

The raw output from the ISAR on-board compass system can be placed onto the ISAR data stream by setting the fourth flag in the isarconf.icf file using the following lines:

 

# L6: 10 flags:0=log meanrec data to flashcard,1=compute SSTskin (set realtime SST calculation data above) 2=test at startup, 3=print raw PNI data 4=print raw GPS data, 5= write out meanrec to s

tdout, 6=enable SCS output, 7-9=unused  (int[10])

0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0

 

The PNI data string provided by the PNI unit will appear as $PNIST data records (see section 8 below).

 

7.3.13 Requesting ISAR to log SCS enabled data

You can request SCS enabled data strings ($I5SCS and $SCSST) in addition to $ISAR5 and $I5SST outputs by setting the sixth flag in the isarconf.icf file using the following lines:

 

# L6: 10 flags:0=log meanrec data to flashcard,1=compute SSTskin (set realtime SST calculation data above) 2=test at startup, 3=print raw PNI data 4=print raw GPS data, 5= write out meanrec to s

tdout, 6=enable SCS output, 7-9=unused  (int[10])

0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0

 

The SCS enabled data will appear as $I5SCS and $SCSST data records (see section 8 below).

 

7.3.14 Changing PNI TCM-2 pitch and Roll alarm limits

During a given deployment, should a ship exceed certain roll and pitch limits the ISAR system will flag $ISAR5 data records accordingly using the 7th and 8th bits of the StatusWord (see section 8) The following lines of the isarconf.icf file may be used for this purpose:

 

# L22: PNI sensor pitch warning limit (deg) (float)

5.0

# L23: PNI sensor roll warning limit  (deg) (float)

5.0

 

Notes:

  1. Pitch and roll limits are used to provide warnings only reported via the StatusWord bits 7-8

7.3.15 Using the ISAR5 RS485 sub-system

The ISAR provides a means to connect RS485 devices to the main system and log data from these devices directly into the ISAR data stream.  For each RS485 device the following parameters must be set in the isarconf.icf file:

 

(a)   A label for the device

(b)   The RS485 address

(c)   The device specific read command

(d)   A bitdelay in milliseconds

 

Each RS485 device should be configured at 9600 baud, with no stop bits and no parity.  The following isarconf.icf lines are provided for RS485 configuration:

 

# L15: 8 External RS485 device description (str[8][80] separate fields with ' ', Default=NoDevice)

RhoPD_D1102_CM11Solarimeter NoDevice NoDevice NoDevice NoDevice NoDevice NoDevice NoDevice

# L16: 8 External RS485 device address (0x03 and 0x0E are reserved) (int[8], default=-1)

4,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1

# L17: 8 External RS485 device data read command (str[8][30] separate fields with ' ', Default=NoCommand)

4RD NoCommand NoCommand NoCommand NoCommand NoCommand NoCommand NoCommand

# L18: 8 External RS485 device bitdelay (int[8] separated by ',' Default=-1)

12000,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1

 

In this example, a single RS485 device has been configured with the title RhoPD_D1102_CM11Solarimeter.  It is located at address 4 and the data read command is 4RD.  The bitdelay for this device is 12000.

 

Notes

  1. No spaces are allowed in the device description fields which should not exceed 80- characters per device
  2. MRS485 device address 0x0E (encoder address) and 0x03 (AD 4017 address) are reserved
  3. The present system assumes that a numeric data value is received prefixed by an identifier character (* is the RhoPoint default return).  Please contact the ISAR team for specific requests if this is not appropriate.

7.3.16 Configuration of ISAR basic measurements

To make a basic set of radiance and SSST measurements the ISAR5 instrument needs to be configured appropriately.  The isaros data logging program collects data in measurement cycles.  A measurement cycle consists of the following measurements:

 

 

Note that the isaros program allows you to select up to 10 programmable target scan drum positions specified as angles.  ISAR-5C must first collect n measurements viewing BB1, n measurements viewing BB2 and that for each target position it will make x measurements before moving on to the next target position.  Finally, n measurements viewing BB1 and n measurements viewing BB2 will be made so that a meaningful calibration trend can be established over the measurement period.  Each sample takes approximately 1 second to collect without additional instruments attached to the RS485 port.

 

Use the following to setup ISAR to make your measurements:

·       Scan drum angles

·       Number of samples at each scan drum position

·       Should data be logged to Flashcard?

·       Should an SSTskin measurement be made (if so setup the  calculation)

·       Should GPS data be logged

·       Should PNI data be logged

 

The isaros data logging program will

 

 

i Be sure to capture all of the data to a file on the host computer using the CrossCut Capture to file facility by invoked ctrl-z before starting the isar5 data logging program !!!

 

 

 

8       ISAR5 data record format

The ISAR-5C data stream is a formatted comma separated variable (csv) data record as a NEMA style ASCII string output.  Several NEMA style are used to define ISAR5 data record types which are defined in Table 8.1.

 

Table 8.1 ISAR-5 NEMA style data record identification labels

 

NEMA style identifier

Description

$ISAR5

A standard ISAR-5 data record

$IS485

A data record containing external RS485 device outputs

$IS5MR

An averaged ISAR-5 data record

$I5SST

A SSTskin data record for real time operations

$I5CAL

Calibration data used to compute real time SST measurement provided in $I5SST

$GPRMC

GPS data: Recommended minimum Specific GPS/Transit data

$GPGGA

GPS fix data (NEMA version 2.1)

$PNIST

TCM2 Electronic compass data record

$ISMSG

A comment or message string

$CONFG

Configuration data and messages relating to the isarconf.icf configuration file

$DIAGN

Diagnostics test outputs

 

Each data record type is fully expanded in the sections below.  Note that these records are valid for the isaros v7.2 code base and may require updating for more recent software releases.

 

8.1     $ISMSG data records

Various $ISMSG strings will appear in the data file to provide an indication of warnings or general operations status according to the status of the instrument.  The $ISMSG format is

 

$ISMSG,<timestring>,<message text>

 

<timestring> takes the ISO 8601 standard format for a single variable date+time having the format

 

YYYYMMDDTHHMMSS

 

For example, we might expect the following when ISAR-5C is unable to obtain GPS information when there are no satellites in view:

 

$ISMSG,20030523T134522,WARNING: Bad GPS record

$ISMSG,20030523T134522,KT15 is now turned ON

$ISMSG,20030523T134522,isarconf.icf last edit date: 2003-03-05

$ISMSG,20030523T134522,ISAR-5C ID: 2

 

$ISMSG strings are categoriesed as WARNINGS or as FATAL, where the latter stops the onboard isaros data collection system form running (normally due to a badly configured isarconf.icf file).

 

8.2     Standard data record format ($ISAR5)

A standard ISAR5 data record produced approximately each second by the ISAR system.  Each sensor on board the ISAR is read and the data value stored in the lowest processed state and constitutes the level-0 engineering data output.  The format of an $ISAR5 record is fully described in Table 8.2.1 and 8.2.2.

 

Table 8.2.1 Format of $ISAR5 data record (isaros-v7.2 2004/03/14)

 

CSV Position Example Units Description Format
0 $ISAR5   NEMA style identifier String
1 20030523T134544Z yymmddThhmmssZ ISO 8601 time string YearMothDayTHourMinuteSecondZ Integer
2 25.02 Degrees Scan drum position Float
3 0.0603 mV Optical rain gauge signal Float
4 0.7025 mV KT15.85D signal Float
5 1.7525 Counts BB1 thermistor 3 (base) Float
6 1.7386 Counts BB1 thermistor 2 (base) Float
7 1.7353 Counts BB1 thermistor 1 (aperture) Float
8 2.3296 Counts BB2 thermistor 3 (base) Float
9 2.3284 Counts BB2 thermistor 2 (base) Float
10 2.3295 Counts BB2 thermistor 1 (aperture) Float
11 2200 Counts 5 Volt reference voltage for BB thermistors (should be ~2200 +/- 100counts) Integer
12 2000 Counts BB Aperture thermistor 1 Integer
13 2300 Counts BB aperture thermistor 2 Integer
14 1200 Counts BB aperture thermistor 3 Integer
15 1900 Counts KT15 external case thermistor Integer
16 1977, Counts ZnSe window thermistor Integer
17 2612 Counts TT8 computer board thermistor Integer
18 3795 Counts Input power Integer
19 0 0 or 1 Shutter switch 1 Integer (1 active)
20 1 0 or 1 Shutter switch 2 Integer (1 active)
21 -3.1000 Degrees Pitch Float
22 1.1000 Degrees Roll Float
23 181.70 Degrees Azimuth Float
24 22.5 Degrees PNI board temperature Float
25 50.893501 Degrees Latitude Float
26 -1.39583 Degrees Longitude Float
27 11.0 Knots Speed over ground Float
28 32.4 DegreesT Course made good Float
29 4.2 Degrees Magnetic variation Float
30 2   ISAR-5C serial number Integer
31 3474   KT15.85D serial number Integer
32 289.1 Kelvin KT15 target temperature measurement Float
33 290.2 Kelvin KT15 internal reference temperature Float
34 23634128   Record status flags Long (see table 4.2 below)

 

 

Table 8.2.1 $ISAR5 data record status word bit field interpretation (isaros-v7.1 2004/01/23)

 

Bitfield position

Description if set

0

Data collected in a rain event

1

GPS data are bad

2

PNI data are bad

3

TT8 clock reset from GPS

4

Rain detected by ORG

5

Shutter is Closed

6

Optical rain gauge data are bad

7

PNI roll limit exceeded

8

PNI pitch limit exceeded

9

RS485 data present in data record

10

Bad data from 18 bit A/D

11

Bad scan drum position

12

Not used

13

Not used

14

Not used

15

Not used

 

 

Table 8.4.3 Format of a $IS485 data record (isaros-v7.2 2004/03/14)

 

CSV Position Example Units Description Format
0 $IS485   NEMA style identifier String
1 20030523T134544Z yymmddThhmmssZ ISO 8601 time string YearMothDayTHourMinuteSecondZ Integer
2-7 Float Various Up to 8 optional user defined RS485 device outputs see bit 9 of Status flags  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.3     Averaged data record format ($IS5MR)

An averaged ISAR5 data record is the mean value of a number of standard data records obtained for a given Scan drum position.  A New $IS5MR data record is created for each new scan drum position.  The format of an $IS5MR record is fully described in Table 8.3.1.  Users may request that $IS5MR data are stored to the ISAR-5 compact flashcard data file isardata.dat by setting user flag[0] in the isarconf.icf file stored on the isar-5 compact flash card.

 

Table 8.3.1 Format of a $IS5MR data record (isaros-v7.2 2004/03/14)

 

CSV Position

Example

Units

Description

Value  and format

0 $IS5MR   NEMA style identifier String
1 20030523T134544Z yyyyddmmThhmmssZ ISO 8601 time string YearMothDayTHourMinuteSecondZ Integer
2 25.02 Degrees Scan drum position Float
3 0.001 Degrees Scan drum position Standard deviation Float
4 30   Number of scan drum position measurements averaged Float
5 0.0603 mV Optical rain gauge signal Float
6 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of optical rain gauge signal Float
7 30   Number of optical rain gauge measurements averaged Float
8 0.7025 mV KT15.85D signal Float
9 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of kt15 signal Float
10 30   Number of kt15 signal measurements averaged Float
11 1.7525 Counts BB1 thermistor 3 (base) Float
12 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of BB1 thermistor 3 Float
13 30   Number of BB! Thermistor 3 measurements averaged Float
14 1.7386 Counts BB1 thermistor 2 (base) Float
15 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of BB1 thermistor 2 Float
16 30   Number of BB1 Thermistor 2 measurements averaged Float
17 1.7353 Counts BB1 thermistor 1 (aperture) Float
18 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of BB1 thermistor 1 Float
19 30   Number of BB1 Thermistor 1 measurements averaged Float
20 2.3296 Counts BB2 thermistor 3 (base) Float
21 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of BB2 thermistor 3 Float
22 30   Number of BB2 Thermistor 3 measurements averaged Float
23 2.3284 Counts BB2 thermistor 2 (base) Float
24 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of BB2 thermistor 2 Float
25 30   Number of BB2 Thermistor 2 measurements averaged Float
26 2.3295 Counts BB2 thermistor 1 (aperture) Float
27 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of BB2 thermistor 1 Float
28 30   Number of BB1 Thermistor 2 measurements averaged Float
29 2200 Counts 5 Volt reference voltage for BB thermistors (should be ~2200 +/- 100counts) Integer
30 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of 5V reference Float
31 30   Number of 5V reference measurements averaged Float
32 2000 Counts BB aperture thermistor 1 Integer
33 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of BB aperture thermistor 1 Float
34 30   Number of BB aperture thermistor 1 measurements averaged Float
35 2000 Counts BB aperture thermistor 2 Integer
36 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of BB aperture thermistor 2 Float
37 30   Number of BB aperture thermistor 2 measurements averaged Float
38 2000 Counts BB aperture thermistor 3 Integer
39 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of BB aperture thermistor 3 Float
40 30   Number of BB aperture thermistor 3 measurements averaged Float
41 2000 Counts KT15 external body thermistor Integer
42 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation kt15 external body thermistor Float
43 30   Number of kt15 external body measurements averaged Float
44 1910, Counts ZnSe window thermistor Integer
45 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of ZnSe thermistor Float
46 30   Number of ZnSe thermistor measurements averaged Float
47 2612 Counts TT8 computer board thermistor Integer
48 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of TT8 computer board thermistor Float
49 30   Number of TT8 board thermistor measurements averaged Float
50 3795 Counts Input power Integer
51 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of input power Float
52 30   Number of input power measurements averaged Float
53 0 0 or 1 Shutter switch 1 Integer (1 active)
54 1 0 or 1 Shutter switch 2 Integer (1 active)
57 -3.1000 Degrees Pitch Float
58 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of pitch measurement Float
59 30   Number of pitch measurements averaged Float
60 1.1000 Degrees Roll Float
61 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of roll measurements Float
62 30   Number of roll measurements averaged Float
63 181.70 Degrees Azimuth Float
64 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of azimuth measurements Float
65 30   Number of azimuth measurements averaged Float
66 22.5 Degrees PNI board temperature Float
67 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of PNI board temperature Float
68 30   Number of PNI temperature measurements averaged Float
69 50.893501 Degrees Latitude Float
70 -1.39583 Degrees Longitude Float
71 11.0 Knots Speed over ground (SOG) Float
72 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of SOG Float
73 30   Number of SOG measurements averaged Float
74 32.4 DegreesT Course made good (CMG) Float
75 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of CMG Float
76 30   Number CMG of measurements averaged Float
77 4.2 Degrees Magnetic variation Float
78 0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of magnetic variation Float
79 30   Number of magnetic variation measurements averaged Float
80 2   ISAR-5C serial number Integer
81 3474   KT15.85D serial number Integer
82 289.9 Kelvin KT15 Target  temperature Float
83 0.001 Kelvin SD KT15 target temperature Float
84 30   Number of KT15 target temperature measurements averaged integer
85 290.9 Kelvin KT15 internal reference temperature Float
86 0.001 Kelvin SD KT15 reference  temperature Float
87 30   Number of KT15 reference temperature measurements averaged integer
88-112 Float Various 8 optional user defined RS485 device outputs with SD and number of observations  
  0.001 Degrees Standard deviation of RS485 measurement Float
  30   Number of RS485 measurements averaged Float

 

8.4     SSTskin data record format ($I5SST) and associated calibration data ($I5CAL) record format

If a user has requested that ISAR-5 calculate the SSTskin in real time by setting user flag[1] in the isarconf.icf file, an $I5SST data record will be produced.  In addition, a $I5CAL data record is also produced which contains the blackbody calibration data that has been used to compute the real time SSTskin measurement. A New $I5SST data record is created for each scan sequence when suffiecit data are available for real time SSTskin calculation.  Note that for the SSTskin calculation to be valid, the isarconf.icf file must contain appropriate configuration information in the SST calculation section including the scan drum angle index for both sea and sky views and the value to use for the emissivity of sea water (see section 7.3.7).  The format of an $I5SST record is fully described in Table 8.4.1 and the format of a $I5CAL record is described in Table 8.4.2.  Users may request that $I5SST data are stored to the ISAR-5 compact flashcard data file isardata.dat by setting user flag[0] in the isarconf.icf file stored on the isar-5 compact flash card.

 

Table 8.4.1 Format of a $I5SST data record (isaros-v7.2 2004/03/14)

 

CSV Position

Example

Units

Description

Value  and format

0 $I5SST   NEMA style identifier String
1 20030523T134544Z yyyymmddThhmmssZ ISO 8601 time string YearMothDayTHourMinuteSecondZ Integer
2 299.78 Kelvin Mean SSTskin Float
3 155.0 Degrees Mean Scan drum position for sea view data Float
4 0.78 Counts Mean KT15 signal for sea view Float
5 0.023 Counts Mean Standard deviation of sea view signal Float
6 40   Number of valid $ISAR5 sea view data records used in calculation Integer
7 25.0 Degrees Mean Scan drum position for sky view data Float
8 0.38 Counts Mean KT15 signal for sky view Float
9 0.235 Counts Mean Standard deviation of sky view signal Float
10 10   Number of valid $ISAR5 sky view data records used in calculation Integer
11 1.1000 Degrees Mean Roll for sea view segment Float
12 0.0233 Degrees Standard deviation of Roll for sea view segment Float
13 -3.1000 Degrees Mean Pitch for sea view segment Float
14 0.0233 Degrees Standard deviation of Pitch for sea view segment Float
15 50.893501 Degrees Mean Latitude for sea view segment Float
16 -1.39583 Degrees Mean Longitude for sea view segment Float
17 11.0 Knots Mean Speed over ground for sea view segment Float
18 32.4 DegreesT Mean Course made good for sea view segment Float
19 4.2 Degrees Mean Magnetic variation for sea view segment Float
20 2234 counts Mean 5V BB reference voltage Integer
21 2234 counts Mean Electronics board thermistor Integer
22 2343 counts Mean nput power supply Integer
23 0.98588   Emissivity value used in temperature calculation Float
24 2/2853 ID/Serial ISAR-5 instrument ID+kt15 serial Integer

 

Table 8.4.2 Format of a $I5CAL data record (isaros-v7.2 2004/03/14)

 

CSV Position

Example

Units

Description

Value  and format

0 $I5CAL   NEMA style identifier String
1 20030523T134422Z yyymmddThhmmssZ ISO 8601 time string YearMothDayTHourMinuteSecondZ for Calibration data on BB1 Integer
2 280.0 Degrees Mean Scan drum position for BB1 data Float
3 0.001 Degrees Mean Standard deviation of BB1 scan drum position Float
4 2.459 Counts Mean BB1 Temperature (mean base thermistors) Float
5 0.001 Counts Mean Standard deviation of BB1 temperature Float
6 30   Number of samples used to compute BB1 temperature Integer
7 0.6837 Counts Mean BB1 KT15 signal Float
8 0.0001 Counts Mean Standard deviation of BB1 temperature Float
9 30   Number of samples used to compute BB1 temperature Integer
10 20030523T134422Z yyymmddThhmmssZ ISO 8601 time string YearMothDayTHourMinuteSecondZ for Calibration data on BB2 Integer
11 325.0 Degrees Mean Scan drum position for BB2 data Float
12 0.001 Degrees Mean Standard deviation of BB2 scan drum position Float
13 2.179 Counts Mean BB2 Temperature (mean base thermistors) Float
14 0.001 Counts Mean Standard deviation of BB2 temperature Float
15 30   Number of samples used to compute BB2 temperature Integer
16 0.7356 Counts Mean BB2 KT15 signal Float
17 0.0038 Counts Mean Standard deviation of BB2 temperature Float
18 30   Number of samples used to compute BB2 temperature Integer

 

 

 

8.5     GPS Fix data (NEMA version 2.1) format ($GPGGA)

The raw output of the on-board GPS receiver is placed onto the ISAR-5 data stream.  The $GPSGGA data format is a csv data record formatted according to the NEMA version 2.1 standard as shown in Table 8.5.1.

 

Table 8.5.1 Format of a $GPGGA data record

 

CSV Position

Example

Units

Description

Value  and format

0 $GPGGA   NEMA version 2.1 identifier String
1 122233.2 UTC time Hhmmss.s format Float
2 50.233 Degrees Latitude Float
3 N Hemisphere N or S Char
4 1.344 Degrees Longitude Float
5 E Quadrant E or W Char
6 1 Flag GPS QC indicator: 0=NoGPS, 1=GPS, 2=DGPS Integer
7 4 Count Number of satellites in use Integer
8 2.1   Horizontal Dilution of Precision (HDOP) Float
9 9.4 Meters Antennae altitude Float
10 M   Character indicating Antennae altitude is in Meters Char
11 4.9 Meters Geodal separation in Meters.  Difference between WGS-84 earth ellipsoid and mean sea level Float
12 M   Char indicating Geodal separation is in Meters Char
13 5.7 Seconds Age of differential GPS data.  Time in seconds since the last Type 1 or 9 upgrade Float
14 0001 ID Differential reference station ID (0000 – 1023) Integer

 

Note that if insufficient data are available due to a lack of satellites no data will be shown but the commas of the csv format will be shown.

 

8.6     GPS recommended minimum specific GPS/transit data (NEMA version 2.1) format ($GPRMC)

The raw output of the on-board GPS receiver is placed onto the ISAR-5 data stream.  The $GPSRMC data format is a csv data record formatted according to the NEMA version 2.1 standard as shown in Table 8.6.1.

 

Table 8.6.1 Format of a $GPGGA data record

 

CSV Position

Example

Units

Description

Value  and format

0 $GPRMC   NEMA version 2.1 identifier String
1 122233.2 UTC time Hhmmss.s format Float
2 A Character Status: A=valid, V=navigation receiver warning Char
3 50.345 Degrees Latitude Float
4 N Hemisphere N or S Char
5 2.675 Degrees Longitude Float
6 E Quadrant E or W Char
7 20.4 Knots Speed over ground (SOG) Float
8 234.7 Degrees T Course made good Float
9 030326 Date Yymmdd Integer
10 3.4 Degrees Magnetic variation Float
11 E Quadrant E or W Char
12     Checksum Integer

 

Note that if insufficient data are available due to a lack of satellites no data will be shown but the commas of the csv format will be shown.

 

8.7     TCM2 Electronic compass record format ($PNIST)

The raw output of the on-board Precision Navigation TCM2 electronic compass module is placed onto the ISAR-5 data stream.  The 2 standard output data record provided by the ISAR instrument has the following format

 

$PNIST,$C<compass>$P<pitch>$R<roll>$T<temperature>*<checksum>

for example

$PNIST,$C151.2P-1.0R-3.2T27.5*22

 

The $PNIST ISAR data record data format is shown in Table 8.7.1.

 

Table 8.7.1 Format of a $PNIST data record

 

ID

Units

Description

Example

$PNIST   NEMA style identifier $PNIST
$C<compass> Degrees Compass heading $C151.2
$P<pitch> Degrees Pitch measurement $P-1.0
$R<roll> Degrees Roll measurement $R-3.2
$T<temperature> Celsius Temperature of Electronics (0.5C precision) $T27.5

 

8.8     Diagnostic data record format ($DIAGN)

ISAR5 diagnostic data is collected when the ISAR instrument is booted and is prefixed by the $DIAGN NEMA style identifier.  The data are not used for any purpose other than to identify them as diagnostic data during the instrument startup process. If a $DIAGN output is requested, diagnostic data are written to the stdoutput and a delay of 10s is provided for the user to quit the deployment if required.

 


9       Maintenance

The proper and regular maintenance of your ISAR-5C instrument is fundamental to ensuring that accurate and dependable data are obtained.  All components have been selected for their resistance to the harsh marine atmosphere and seawater but inevitably, after long deployments, optical and mechanical components will require a thorough service.

 

9.1     General maintenance

After every deployment:

 

 

i  It is wise practice to ensure that a proper calibration is obtained before and after any maintenance activity.

 

The following sections describe in detail several maintenance procedures including:

 

 


9.2      Replacement of mirror (Procedure RM)

This procedure describes the steps required to replace the scan drum mirror located within the scan drum assembly. While a fairly simple operation, this requires that the ISAR-5C is dissembled and the scan drum assembly removed.  Be sure to allocate sufficient space on the workbench for this procedure preferably in a clean dust free laboratory to avoid contamination of the optical components. Be sure to revise the instrument maintenance record spreadsheet (ISAR-5C-instrument-???.xls) !!

 

i The gold plated mirror used in the ISAR-5C system uses a glass substrate and is consequently a brittle structure that can be easily broken. Furthermore, the protective coatings deposited onto the gold surface may easily scratch. For all these reasons, please use extreme care when handling the ISAR-5C mirror using fresh rubber gloves in a clean room.

9.2.1     Equipment and supplies

For this procedure you will need the following tools:

 

 

You may need the following replacement ISAR-5C components and supplies:

 

 

9.2.2     Procedure RM

Follow these steps to replace the ISAR-5C scan drum mirror:

 

RM-1.        Make sure the ISAR-5C shutter is in the open position be fore commencing this procedure.

 

RM-2.        Place the ISAR instrument standing vertically with the drive body at the top (the short body section).

 

RM-3.        Remove the ISAR drive body end cap by undoing the 6 dome nuts holding it in place.  Remove the Dowty washers beneath.

 

RM-4.        Using the tool provided, release the end cap from the drive body.  This may be a particularly tight fit and require patience.  M do not use excessive force!

 

RM-5.        Remove the end cap and inspect the o-ring seal. Replace with part IS5-SOC-047 as required.

 

RM-6.        Remove the outer casing.  Inspect the O-ring on the main body and replace with part IS5-SOC-047 as required.

 

RM-7.        Remove the 6 retaining rods now visible by unscrewing these from the ISAR-5 drive bulkhead and place to one side.

 

RM-8.        Inspect all components for obvious sign of wear or stress.

 

RM-9.        Undo the 5 cap screws holding the drive assembly in place.

 

RM-10.     Disconnect the Shaft encoder RJ-11 jack and also the scan motor power cable.

 

RM-11.     Use a ?? hex key to loosen the shaft coupling that connects the drive motor to the encoder.  Loosen the coupling using only the grub screw furthest away from the drive motor so that the coupling stays connected to the drive motor shaft.

 

RM-12.     Remove the drive motor housing assembly from the ISAR.

 

RM-13.   The US-Digital encoder has a gasket seal on the front face and will require delicate maneuvering to free this seal. Alternatively, the ISAR main bulkhead may be split and the entire scan drum assembly will be removed with the drive bulkhead.  M If you choose this latter option, be extremely careful to ensure that the springs and spring laded bushes do not fall onto the ISAR ZnSe window as this will then need replacing!!

 

RM-14.   Gently slide out the scan drive assembly. M When the scan drive assembly is removed from the ISAR-5C, the springs and the scan drive sealing bushes may spring out !  Furthermore  take care not to deposit anything into the blackbody apertures or in the labyrinth leading to the ZnSe window !

 

RM-15.     You should now have access to the scan drive sub assembly. Take this opportunity to examine the blackbody apertures for contamination as best you can.  Also examine the ZnSe window using a small flashlight to clearly see the window.  Examine the scan drum main bearing for wear.  Examine the shaft coupling between the shaft encoder and the encoder drive motor. Examine all components for corrosion and wear. Finally examine the scan drum bush seals and compression springs for wear and damage.  Replace as required.

 

RM-16.     Locate the scan drum retaining screw on the side of the scan drum and remove

 

RM-17.     The outer scan drum should now slide off. M Take care with the 2 small drive keys locating the scan drum and mirror mounting !

 

RM-18.     You should now have access to the scan drum mirror.  Inspect the mirror and record your results in the instrument log.

 

RM-19.     Unscrew the 4 countersunk screws holding the scan mirror retaining plate in place.

 

RM-20.     Remove the scan mirror retaining plate.

 

RM-21.     Remove the scan mirror.

 

RM-22.     The mirror may be cleaned using a wash of distilled water followed by a wash in acetone.  If the mirror is scratched or dirty following this procedure, discard and replace with IS5-SOC-004.

 

RM-23.     M Replace the mirror taking great care not to tough the surface of the mirror.

 

RM-24.     Replace the mirror retaining plate and 4 countersunk screws.  You may use a small amount of threadlock to secure the screws I place.

 

RM-25.     Replace the scan drum using the keys

 

RM-26.     Replace the scan drum retaining bolt using a small amount of threadlock as required.

 

RM-27.     You are now ready to replace the scan drum subassembly back into the ISAR-5C Instrument.  This requires that you first re-install the scan drum bushes and compression springs before attempting to re-install the scan drive assembly.  Use the tool provided to retain the scan bushes in place while relocating the scan drive assembly.  Once the bushes are in contact with the outside diameter of the scan drum, the tool can be removed and the scan drum carefully pushed home.  Prior to inserting the US-Digital shaft encoder, use a smear of HYLOMAR® universal blue gasket and joining compound to create a gasket seal between the encoder and the encoder faceplate making sure that the compression flow of the gasket compound will seal the outer corner of the seat.  Do not use excessive amounts of the gasket compound!!!

 

RM-28.     Replace the scan drive retaining bolts and tighten.

 

RM-29.     Replace the 6 retaining rods by screwing these back into the ISAR-5 drive bulkhead.

 

RM-30.     Lightly grease the drive bulkhead o-ring seal. Inspect the O-ring on the main body and replace with part IS5-SOC-047 as required.

 

RM-31.     Replace the outer casing. 

 

RM-32.     Lightly grease the end cap o-ring seal. Replace with part IS5-SOC-047 as required.

 

RM-33.     Replace the end cap and press firmly home ensuring that there is sufficient thread exposed on the end cap retaining rods to start the dome nuts when the dowty washers are in place.

 

RM-34.     Add a small amount of silicone grease to each retaining rod end.

 

RM-35.     Inspect the dowty washers for damage and replace with part IS5-SOC-040 as necessary.

 

RM-36.     Inspect the Dome nuts for damage and replace with part IS5-SOC-037 as required.

 

RM-37.     Carefully tighten the dome nuts to ensure an even seating of the end cap.

 

RM-38.     Enter details of the replacement components into the instrument maintenance record spreadsheet (ISAR-5C-instrument-???.xls) making sure to quote all serial and batch numbers as required.


9.3      Reconfiguration of US-DIGITAL shaft encoder Procedure (SE)

Follow the instructions in the US-digital manual provided on the ISAR-5C CD-ROM.  Settings should be for 3600 increments to provide an encoder resolution of 0.1°.  The reference position should be set and recorded.  This value should be entered into the isarconf.icf file.

 

9.3.1     Equipment and supplies

For this procedure you will need the following tools:

 

 

You may need the following replacement ISAR-5C components and supplies:

 

9.3.2     Procedure SE

Follow these steps to reconfigure the U.S Digital shaft encoder:

 

SE-1.         Make sure the ISAR-5C shutter is in the open position before commencing this procedure.

 

SE-2.         Using the proto software, if possible set the scan drum aperture edge to just tough the back face of the ISAR-5C main body (an absolute angle of 355.5° assuming a 0° shaft encoder zero).

 

SE-3.         Follow procedures RM-1 to RM-6 in order to gain access to the shaft encoder RJ45 plug.

 

SE-4.         Disconnect the ISAR-5C RJ45 plug

 

SE-5.         Connect the A2D-B adaptor RJ45 plug to the ISAR shaft encoder.

 

SE-6.         Use the US-Digital software “SEI Explorer” to set the encoder for 3600 resolution (0.1° increment). Select the menu option found on the top left hand window pane showing the encoder response to change each setting in turn.  A2 Encoders should be set to a resolution of 14400 (0.025 deg resolution), 9600 baud, scale factor of 1 and no mode setting.  Assign an address 0x0E (decimal 14) to the encoder to prohibit contention with other RS485 devices.  Use the “Get Factory Info” menu item to check the configuration.

 

SE-7.         It is necessary to set the zero position of the shaft encoder by either directly entering the zero position into the shaft encoder eeprom. If you were unable to set the position of the scan drum, use the U.S Digital software tools provided set the scan drum aperture edge to just tough the back face of the ISAR-5C main body (an absolute angle of 355.5° assuming a 0° shaft encoder zero).

 

SE-8.         Store the zero position

 

SE-9.         Lightly grease the drive bulkhead o-ring seal. Inspect the O-ring on the main body and replace with part IS5-SOC-047 as required.

 

SE-10.      Replace the outer casing. 

 

SE-11.      Lightly grease the end cap o-ring seal. Replace with part IS5-SOC-047 as required.

 

SE-12.      Replace the end cap and press firmly home ensuring that there is sufficient thread exposed on the end cap retaining rods to start the dome nuts when the dowty washers are in place.

 

SE-13.      Add a small amount of silicone grease to each retaining rod end.

 

SE-14.      Inspect the dowty washers for damage and replace with part IS5-SOC-040 as necessary.

 

SE-15.      Inspect the Dome nuts for damage and replace with part IS5-SOC-037 as required.

 

SE-16.      Carefully tighten the dome nuts to ensure an even seating of the end cap.

 

SE-17.      Enter details of the replacement components into the instrument maintenance record spreadsheet (ISAR-5C-instrument-???.xls) making sure to quote all serial and batch numbers as required.


9.4     Replacement of ISAR-5C ZnSe window (Procedure RW)

This procedure describes the steps required to replace the ZnSe window.  While a fairly simple operation, this requires that the ISAR-5C is dissembled as the window is situated deep within the ISAR-5C instrument.  Be sure to allocate sufficient space on the workbench for this procedure preferably in a clean dust free laboratory to avoid contamination of the optical components. Be sure to revise the instrument maintenance record spreadsheet (ISAR-5C-instrument-???.xls) !!

 

i Zinc selenide (ZnSe) is toxic and we recommend that you consult your local health and safety guidelines when handling this material has a very brittle structure and can be easily broken. Furthermore, the antireflection coatings deposited onto the window may easily scratch. For all these reasons, please use extreme care when handling the ISAR-5C window using fresh rubber gloves in a clean room.

 

9.4.1     Equipment and supplies

For this procedure you will need the following tools:

 

 

You may need the following replacement ISAR-5C components and supplies:

 

9.4.2     Procedure RW

Follow these steps to Replace the ISAR-5C ZnSe Window:

 

RW-1.           Place the ISAR instrument standing vertically with the main body at the top (the long section).

 

RW-2.           Open the ISAR main body end cap by undoing the 6 dome nuts holding it in place.  Remove the dome nuts and the Dowty washers beneath.

 

RW-3.           Using the tool provided, release the end cap from the main body.  This may be a particularly tight fit and require patience.  M do not use excessive force!  Be careful not to strain any wires when removing the end cap ! Gently ease the cap away and disconnect all wires attached to the plugs on the end cap using the inline plugs provided.  Disconnect the GPS antenna from the GPS board and the earth wire from the case.

 

RW-4.           Remove the end cap and inspect the o-ring seal. Replace with part IS5-SOC-047 as required.

 

RW-5.           Remove the outer casing.  Inspect the O-ring on the main body and replace with part IS5-SOC-047 as required.

 

RW-6.           Remove the 6 retaining rods now visible by unscrewing these from the ISAR-5 main bulkhead and place to one side. M Be careful not to damage the window thermistor cable which should be looped around one of the retaining rods !

 

RW-7.           Remove the 2.5 mm cap screw holding the window thermistor cable retainer taking care not to damage the sensor cable.

 

RW-8.           Be especially careful of the window thermstor that can now be removed from its mount. M Take great care not to contaminate the area with old thermal grease during this operation !  Wrap the thermistor in protective foam as any physical shock or damage may render the calibration void.

 

RW-9.           In order to gain proper access to the ZnSe window, it is necessary to remove the entire optical bench from the ISAR-5C main bulkhead.  Undo and remove the 4 cap screws holding the optical bench to the main bulkhead.  The optical bench should stay in place as it is maintained by two precision dowel pins.

 

RW-10.        Prepare a safe and secure area to place the optical bench when removed.  Carefully remove the optical bench (with the KT15 and electronics in place) from the main bulkhead.  A gentle rocking motion normally releases the dowells. M Be careful not to damage any cables by pulling or stressing them when removing the optical bench. 

 

RW-11.        You should now have a clear view of the ZnSe window which is held in place by 4 M4 cap screws and a black retaining plate. Inspect the area for moisture/salt contamination and note any contamination.  Contamination may indicate a broken seal on the window mounting plate.

 

RW-12.        Remove the 4 M4 cap screws and inspect the o-ring seals.  Replace with part IS5-SOC-048 as required.

 

RW-13.        Remove the ZnSe window retaining plate and inspect the area for moisture/salt contamination.

 

RW-14.        Remove the o-ring seal above the window and discard.

 

RW-15.        Thoroughly clean the retaining plate with alcohol and set to one side.

 

RW-16.        Carefully remove the ZnSe window.  It might be easier to turn the ISAR-5C upside down and tip the window out into your gloved hand rather than to contaminate the window.

 

RW-17.        Inspect the ZnSe window for corrosion, scratches or damage. If excessive corrosion or damage is evident discard the window and replace with part IS5-SOC-012 as required. The window may be cleaned using distilled water and a soft lint free cloth followed by a wash in alcohol. 

 

RW-18.        Inspect the ZnSe window mount plate for corrosion.  It should not be necessary to remove this component if no obvious contamination is present.

 

RW-19.       Thoroughly clean the ZnSe seating area with alcohol.  M Be careful not to spill or drop anything onto the gold scan mirror which is beneath the  ZnSe window mounting !!

 

RW-20.        If required, replace the thermal grease in the ZnSe window thermistor mounting and wipe off excess grease.

 

RW-21.       Replace the ZnSe window being careful to M avoid touching the face of the component using rubber gloves at all times.

 

RW-22.       Lightly grease a new ZnSe o-ring seal (part IS5-SOC-047) and M carefully lay this onto the face of the ZnSe window taking care not to contaminate the window surface.

 

RW-23.        Replace the ZnSe window retaining plate.

 

RW-24.        Replace M4 cap screws and new o-ring washers M taking care to tighten each screw slowly and evenly to prevent excessive strain on the window and possible cracking.

 

RW-25.        Relocate the ZnSe window thermistor into the thermal grease filled seating.

 

RW-26.        Replace the M2.5 ZnSe window thermistor cable retainer making sure that the cable is clear of the end cap retaining rod tapped hole.

 

RW-27.       M Inspect the new window – does everything look ok ?

 

RW-28.        Carefully replace the optical bench on the location dowels.

 

RW-29.        Replace the 4 M8 retaining cap screws and tighten slowly to ensure an even seating of the optical bench.  M Inspect the seating- it is ok ?

 

RW-30.        Re-fit 6 end plate retaining rods taking care to ensure that the window thermistor cable is suitable wrapped around the retaining rod.

 

RW-31.        Lightly grease the o-ring seals for the body section on both the main bulkhead.

 

RW-32.        Ensure that all electronics cables and plugs are centered and accessible so that you can access them after the main body case is replaced

 

RW-33.        Lightly grease the main body o-ring seal using silicone grease.

 

RW-34.        Replace the main body case.

 

RW-35.        Reconnect all plugs, the earth wire and GPS unit.

 

RW-36.        Lightly grease the end cap o-ring seal using silicone grease.

 

RW-37.        Replace the end cap and press firmly home ensuring that there is sufficient thread exposed on the end cap retaining rods to start the dome nuts when the dowty washers are in place.

 

RW-38.        Add a small amount of silicone grease to each retaining rod end.

 

RW-39.        Inspect the dowty washers for damage and replace with part IS5-SOC-040 as necessary.

 

RW-40.        Inspect the Dome nuts for damage and replace with part IS5-SOC-037 as required.

 

RW-41.        Carefully tighten the dome nuts to ensure an even seating of the end cap.

 

RW-42.        Enter details of the replacement components into the instrument maintenance record spreadsheet (ISAR-5C-instrument-???.xls) making sure to quote all serial and batch numbers as required.

 


9.5     Configuration of the PNI-TCM2 (procedure PNI)

The PNI TCM-2 compass module must be correctly configured before using the device in an ISAR instrument.  The configuration of a PNI0-TCM2 module is performed using the Proto software system that must be run from the ISAR flashcard.  The Proto option ‘P’ under the ENGINEERING MENU (select option ‘>’) must be used to send configuration commands to the PNI instrument.  These are then stored on the PNI TCM-2 EEPROM.  The output configuration of the PNI-TCM2 can be checked at any time using the Proto command ‘p’.

 

9.5.1     Equipment and supplies

 

9.5.2     Procedure PNI

PNI-1.   Stop the ISAOROS operational code after turning the ISAR on.  You should be returned to the TOM8> prompt.

 

PNI-2.   At the TOM8> prompt type PROTOxxx.RUN (where xxx) refers to the software version number of the Proto code) to run the Proto software.

 

PNI-3.   Using option ‘P’ from the engineering menu (option ‘>’), clear the on-board calibration data by sending the command:  cc <enter>

 

PNI-4.   Disable fast sampling of the TCM-2 by sending the command:  fast=d <enter>

 

PNI-5.   Set the PNI-TCM2 clock rate using the command: clock=10.0 <enter>

 

PNI-6.   Set the PNI-TCM2 clip rate using the command:  clip=40 <enter>

 

PNI-7.   Set the PNI-TCM2 baud rate to 9600 using the command: baud=5 <enter>

 

PNI-8.   Set the PNI-TCM2 temperature units to centigrade using the command: ut=c <enter>

 

PNI-9.   Set the PNI-TCM2 compass units to 360º full circle using the command: uc=d <enter>

 

PNI-10. Set the PNI-TCM2 inclinometer units to 360º full circle using the command: ui=d <enter>

 

PNI-11. Set the PNI-TCM2 RS232 word format to standard TCM2 output word using the command: sdo=t <enter>

 

PNI-12. Enable the PNI-TCM2 compass data for output word using the command: ec=e <enter>

 

PNI-13. Enable the PNI-TCM2 pitch data for output word using the command: ep=e <enter>

 

PNI-14. Enable the PNI-TCM2 roll data for output word using the command: er=e <enter>

 

PNI-15. Enable the PNI-TCM2 temperature data for output word using the command: et=e <enter>

 

PNI-16. Disable the PNI-TCM2 magentometer data for output word using the command: em=d <enter>

 

PNI-17. Disable the PNI-TCM2 magnetic distortion data for output word using the command: ed=d <enter>

 

PNI-18. Disable the PNI-TCM2 analog output mode using the command: sao=d <enter>

 

PNI-20. Select uncorrected magnetometer readings using the command: ma=u <enter>

 

PNI-21. Save the settings to the PNI-TCM2 eeprom using the command: save <enter>

 

The PNI-TCM2 device should now be configured correctly for the ISAR5 instrument.  Use the Proto command ‘p’ to read a data packet from the PNI-TCM2.  It should return a record identical in format to

 

$C149.3P-1.1R0.0T29.0*0C

 

9.6     Configuration of GPS card (Lassen SK-II)

The Lassen SK-II GPS unit used within an ISAR are configured for a default output other than a $GPGGA NEMA string.  This procedure describes how to modify the Lassen SK-II on-board eeprom configuration settings to permit $GPRMC, $GPGLL and $GPGGA NEMA output only.

9.6.1     Equipment and supplies

For this procedure you will need the following tools:

 

 

 

You may need the following replacement ISAR-5C components and supplies:

 

 

9.6.2     Procedure GPS

Follow these steps to configure the GPS card.

 

GPS-1  Install TSIPCHAT configuration software onto PC

GPS-2 Remove ISAR end cap

GPS-3  Locate GPS unit within ISAR (small PCB to the left of the electronics package – you can see a gold connector that is wired to the center BNC socket on the ISAR end cap)

GPS-4 Disconnect the GPS plug carefully noting connection direction (remove outer casing if this is difficult).  Red and black cables indicate power supply connections.

GPS-5  Connect the Red and black cables from the interface board to 5V d.c on a PSU.

GPS-6 Attach interface board plug to the GPS unit making sure that the red and black cables are located properly. Attach the yellow D-type connector to the PC COM-1 port.

GPS-7 Start the TSIPCHAT program in a DOS window using the command tsipchat –c1 (assuming you are using COM1).  You should see lots of numbers scrolling up the screen.

GPS-8 Configure the output options of the GPS card.  Use ‘?’ to access the TSIPCHAT menu and select option ‘O’ Set I/O options.  Use the space bar to select the Set option and press enter.  Use the space bar to select ‘no’ to the ‘Turn on GPS Spkt 8F-20?’ request (this allows you to manually set the parameters up. 

 

GPS-9 From the main menu (option ?), configure the NEMA output setup by selecting option ‘q’.  Choose the Set (rather than request) option.

 

GPS-10 Return to the main menu and use the command ‘%’ TSIP command string to save the configuration to the GPS eeprom.  Enter the string 0x8E-26, hit return and then press ‘=’ to access the submenu options.  Select submenu option ‘s’ to save the configuration to the GPS eeprom.  If all is well you should get a ‘SEE write successful’ message.  This is described in the Lassen SK-II system developers manual in section 3.7.3 in more detail if you run into problems.

 

 

GPS-11 Turn off the power supply to the GPS card for a minimum of 2 minutes.  Close the TSIPCHAT software and DOS window.

 

GPS-12 Disconnect the yellow D-type plug from the PC COM1 port and connect the orange D-Type to COM1.  This port provides an ASCII output that can be viewed using hyperterm (set to Baud 4800, no handshake). Start up hyperterm in this configuration and power up the GPS card.  Initially you may only see GPGGA strings as the GPS unit locates satellites from a warm boot.  Once these are located you should be able to see GPRMC, GPGLL and GPGGA strings.

 

GPS-13 Power down the GPS card and disconnect the interface from GPS unit,PSU and PC

 

GPS-14 Reconnect ISAR internal plug noting direction of plug (red and black wires)

 

GPS-15 Verify GPS output by booting ISAR and noting the output

 

GPS-16 Replace ISAR end cap.

 

 

 

9.7     Optical alignment (procedure OI)

This procedure describes how to verify that the KT15 is optically aligned within the ISAR instrument.  The design of the ISAR instrument is such that full optical alignment can be performed without the need for an optical bench or external target sighting system.

9.7.1     Equipment and supplies

For this procedure you will need the following tools:

 

 

You may need the following replacement ISAR-5C components and supplies:

 

 

9.7.2     Procedure OI

Follow these steps to optically align the KT15 radiometer head

 

OI-1     Remove end plates

OI-2     Remove outer cases

OI-3     Remove encoder/scan drum assembly

OI-4     Remove optical bench

OI-5     Remove ZnSe window

OI-6     Clean everything

OI-7     Remove electronics from optical bench (do not disconnect)

OI-8     Loosen KT15 mounting plate retaining bolts and slide KT15 mounting plate to rearmost position

OI-9     Attach Laser and laser mount to KT15 lens

OI-10   Replace optical bench

OI-11   Slide KT15 back into operational position and finger tighten retaining bolts.  Make sure that eccentrics are aligned so that the KT15 is approximately parallel with the optical bench axis.

OI12     Turn ISAR so that KT15 is staring vertically up

OI-13   attach optical alignment tool (drop into encoder seating)

OI-14   Turn laser on and adjust KT15 position using eccentric spanner to have the strongest laser ooutput.  Turn the alignment tool to establish the best location.  Tighten the KT15 into position

OI-15   Replace scan drum assembly

OI-16   Attach paper with centerline drawn between the ISAR main body split

OI-17   Turn laser on and operate scan drum.  Laser light should follow the centerline drawn on paper.  Use the KT15 eccentrics to make sure this is the case.

OI-18   Remove optical bench and laser

OI-19   Replace ZnSe window

OI-20   Replacer optical bench – tape up the KT15 adjustments with a note indicating date and person who made the OI

OI-21   Replace electronics

OI-22   Replace end caps

 



 Troubleshooting

Things occasionally go wrong and here are several pointers to help you find out what the problem may be

 

9.8     Software

Check the Isarconf.icf file  this is normally the cause of problems

 

9.9     Hardware

The ISAR electronics boards have been revised as follows:

 

 

The ISAR mechanical system has been revised as follows:

9.9.1     Electronics board schematic diagrams

9.9.2     12 bit A/D Thermistor locations (BB aperture and on KT15 case)

Four thermistors are attached to the TT8 12 bit A/D channels. Three of these are used to monitor the temperature of the blackbody apertures and one is used as an external monitor for the temperature of the Kt15 case. The aperture thermistors are located according to Figure 9.9.2.1

 

 

 

Thermistor

12 bit A/D channel

Location Description

1

1

Beneath BB1 aperture port

2

2

Between BB! And BB2 aperture port

3

3

Above BB2 aperture port

4

4

Attached to the centre of the top of the KT15 outer casing

 

Figure 9.9.2.1  Location of Aperture thermistors and 12 bit A/D channel assignments

 


Appendix A  Example isarconf.icf file (isaros-v7.1)

The following provides an example isarconf.icf configuration file as a guide.  Note that entries shown in blue are user configurable.  All other entries should not be changed unless you are sure of the implications and values.

 

# L1: Title stating purpose of this isarconf file (str[255])

isaros-v7.1 ICF:ISAR-03, ElectronicsBoard:BNL/Jan2002/RevC/001, TT8serial:505416, PersistorBoardSerial:1264, CFcard:SOC001

# L2: Author name, e-mail and telephone number (str[255])

C J Donlon (craig.donlon@metoffice.com +44 (0)1392 886622)

# L3: Last Edit date yyyy-mm-dd (str[15])

2004-01-20

# L4: ISAR-5C serial number (int)

3

# L5: Date and details of last ISAR-5C instrument calibration date (str[255])

Pending (See ISAR-03-instrument-configuration.doc for history)

# L6: 10 flags:0=log data to flashcard,1=compute SSTskin (set realtime SST calculation data above) 2=test at startup, 3=print raw PNI data 4=print raw GPS data, 5=SCS style output, 6-9=unused  (int[10])

1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0

# L7: Number of cycles to wait after rain event (time is ~n*2 secs.  Lab=60 Field= ~350) (int)

60

# L8: Optical rain guage rain mV threshold below which shutter is closed (float). Lab=1.0, Field= ~0.54

1.0

# L9: Optical rain guage rain mV standard deviation above which shutter is closed (float). Lab=1.0, Field= ~0.002

1.0

# L10: Encoder reference position (float,deg)

0.0

# L11: Park angle (normally over lower blackbody) (float,deg)

280.0

# L12: 10 set point scan drum target measurement positions -1 if not used (float, spearator=',') BB1,BB2,sea,sky...

280.0,325.0,25.0,90.0,155,-1.0,-1.0,-1.0,-1.0,-1.0

# L13: 10 Number of samples for each target view. -1 if not used (int)